Species we target

Blackfish / Tautog
Blackfish, also known locally as tautog, are hard fighting and excellent tasting bottom feeding fish. These fish are resident fish that spend the winter offshore in deep water, returning inshore from spring to late fall. Newport Rhode Island has some of the best blackfishing on the east coast.
Note that regulations on tautog change frequently, so be sure to check before going fishing.
Best Months- May through mid-June; late September through October.
Tautog start to arrive inshore in late April. Spring is their spawning season.
Best Times- During daylight hours.
Best Tide- Three hours before, to three hours after high tide.br>
Skill level- Supervised Beginner to Experienced Angler

Best Fishing Methods- Fresh bait on the bottom.

Best Areas
Rocky Areas: Tautog feed on crabs, mollusks and crustaceans that hide in rocks. Find a rocky beach, an area where rock ledge meets the ocean, or even a jetty that extends out into the water. Look for a spot where there is a deep pool of water next to a cluster of rocks. Tautog will cruise that rock formation looking for a meal. During the spring spawn, Tautog may also be caught along sandy/gravel beach areas in Narragansett Bay.


Striped Bass

Striped bass are perhaps the most prized, migratory game fish in the Northeast. Striped bass command the respect of most anglers due to their strength and speed, beauty, and their ability to navigate and hunt down their own prey under extreme weather and tidal conditions. Striped bass are also a popular fish to eat.
Also called "stripers", "linesiders" and "rockfish." Juveniles are called "schoolies."

Striped bass migrate to Rhode Island in large numbers starting in April. The first "schoolie bass" are well short of keeper length, but provide excellent sport for young and old. Small, bucktail jigs, swimming plugs, and weighted, plastic baits cast with light salt water rod and reel combos using 10-15 lb. test line are popular with most anglers.

Striped bass have no teeth, so anglers can safely secure them by the mouth to remove hooks, and quickly return the young fish to the water to ensure their survival.

As April progresses, larger fish start to show up. Keeper sized fish are usually present in good numbers by mid-May. These large Stripers follow schools of bait such as squid, mackerel, and herring, any of which can be obtained through your local bait shop and fished on the bottom. The Bait/Tackle shops can provide you with the popular fish finder rig, used for bottom fishing also.

Accordingly, the shops can also advise you on the best rod and reel combo to use given your level of expertise. Usually an eight to nine foot medium action rod and reel combo using fishing line from 15-20 lb. test, that's capable of casting lure weights up to 2.5 ounces, will be sufficient for these larger fish.


Summer Flounder(fluke)

Scientific Name: Paralichthys dentatus

Common Name: fluke

The summer flounder is a left-sided flounder that is distinguished by the presence of 10 to 14 eye-like spots on its body and a large mouth that extends beyond the eyes which contain rows of very sharp teeth. Average adults may weigh from 2 to 5 pounds, and all females are sexually mature at 17 inches in length. After migrating to offshore waters to spawn during the fall and winter, summer flounder travel into Connecticut’s bays, estuaries and near shore areas during the summer. They are excellent table fare. Most anglers fishing for these toothy flounder will use minnows, mummichugs, squid, mackerel, and menhaden. A light to medium action rod is perfect with 10-15 lb test line.

Weakfish
Scientific Name: Cynoscion regalis

A large, slender, marine fish, it is found along the east coast of North America. The head and back of this fish are dark brown in color with a greenish tinge. The sides have a faint silvery hue with dusky specks, and the belly is white. The origin of its name is based on the weakness of the mouth muscles, which often cause a hook to tear free, allowing the fish to escape. The weakfish grows to about 36 inches in length and 20 lbs in weight. Although catches of that size have dwindled in the past 15 years. It is found along the entire Connecticut coastline. They will readily take minnows and sandworms when they are presented. Weakfish are also known by the American Indian name “Squeteague”. Weakfish spawn in the spring in Connecticut’s coastal estuaries and back bays.

Black Sea Bass
Scientific Name: Centropristis striata

Common Names:Common names: Black sea bass, black bass, humpback (larger males), rock bass, sea bass, pinbass

Size: Up to 25 inches long, commonly 11-12 inches long
Color: Typically blue-black dorsally, fading to a slightly paler color on the belly. Each scale has a light blue-white center, creating stripes along the back and sides. The dorsal fin – and sometimes the anal and pectoral fins – has white lines or splotches. Juveniles go through four color phases: (1) light gray with small dark spots; (2) dark with pale white spots; (3) striped with a horizontal dark stripe; and (4) barred having 6 vertical stripes. Mature males have vivid blue-green around and above the eyes and on top of the head. One distinguishing feature is the elongated tail-filament. Black Sea Bass are phenomenal table fare and are readily targeted by anglers. They can be caught with mummichugs, minnows, sandworms, squid and clams

 
BlueFish

Bluefish are an aggressive, migratory game fish. Their veracious, feeding habits make them an ideal fish for the recreational angler to target.

Other names: "blues", "gators", "choppers", and small bluefish are called "snappers"

Rhode Island Bag Limit is here

Best Months- June through October

Best Times- Daybreak/Early morning, Late Afternoon/Evening, Night

Best Tide- Two hours before to two hours after High Tide

Skill level- Supervised Beginner to Experienced Angler

Best Fishing Methods- Use Popping plugs, Metal Lures, Swimming Plugs, or Bait

 Scup(porgy)
Scientific Name: Stenotomus chrysops

Common Names:Porgy

The scup, commonly called porgy, is a fish which occurs primarily in the Atlantic from Massachusetts to South Carolina. Scup grow as large as 18″ and weigh 3 to 4 lb, but they average 1/2 – 1 lb. In the Middle Atlantic Bight, scup spawn along the inner continental shelf. Their larvae end up in inshore waters, along the coast and in estuarine areas. At 2 to 3 years of age, they mature. Scup winter along the mid and outer continental shelf. When the temperature warms in the spring they migrate inshore. They are fished for by commercial and recreational fishermen

Sharks  ( My Favorite thing to do)

Mako Sharks

Short fin mako shark:
The shortfin mako has a wide distribution. It is found in tropical and temperate waters throughout the world's oceans. In North America it ranges from Watch Hill to point judith and south of montauk point making it easy for Connecticut anglers to target makos. It is commonly seen in offshore waters from Block island rhode island to Montauk new york.
The shortfin mako is a true pelagic species with a primarily anti-tropical distribution. However, they will inhabit the cooler, deeper water of the offshore canyons.  With the ability to elevate body temperature, makos are able to maintain themselves in temperatures of 5-11°C. In this sense the makos are somewhat "warm-blooded," meaning that heat in their blood is conserved within the body and not lost through the gills. They have been recorded at depths 740 m. However, shortfin makos prefer water temperatures between 17-20°C. It has been hypothesized this species migrates seasonally to warmer waters. This theory has been supported by tag and release studies.These studies have also shown that while shortfin makos follow warm water, they do so within the confines of a specific geographical area especially around block island. Consequently, there seems to be limited genetic flow between these geographically distinct populations. Very little is known about the social habits of the shortfin mako, except that it is a solitary shark.

 

Thresher Sharks

Thresher shark:
The Thresher shark is also known as the common thresher, fox shark, sea fox, swiveltail, and thrasher.
The Rhode Island thresher shark, an oceanic and coastal species, inhabits waters around Block Island and south of Block Island. It is most common in the 30 fathom area around Block Island and Montauk. In the Atlantic Ocean, it ranges from Newfoundland to Cuba and southern Brazil to Argentina, and from Norway and British Isles to Ghana and Ivory Coast, including the Mediterranean Sea. Although it is found along the entire U.S. Atlantic coast, it is rare south of New England and common in the waters south of Rhode Island. The thresher shark is a pelagic species inhabiting both coastal and oceanic waters. It is most commonly observed far from the shore of Rhode Island, although it wanders close to the coast in search of food. Adults are common over the continental shelf, while juveniles reside in coastal bays and near shore waters around Watch Hill. It's mostly seen on the surface but it inhabits waters to 1,800 feet in depth.Threshers are considered a highly migratory species in the U.S. by the National Marine Fisheries Service for fishery management purposes.
The thresher shark can be easily identified by the long upper lobe of the caudal fin. The lobe can be as long as the body and gives the tail a slender "whiplike" appearance. It has a moderate size eye and a first dorsal fin free rear tip located ahead of the pelvic fins. The pectoral fins are falcate and narrow tipped. The sides above the pectoral-fin bases are marked with a white patch that extends forward from the abdominal area. Threshers are usually dark brown and slate gray but can be almost completely black. They are white on their underside, but have dark spots near the pelvic fin and the caudal peduncle. The white color can extend above the pectoral fins onto the head.
Bony fish make up 97% of the thresher's diet. They feed mostly on small schooling fish such as menhaden, herring, Atlantic saury, sand lance, and mackerel. Bluefish and butterfish are the most common meal. They also feed on bonito and squid. Thresher sharks encircle schools of fish and then stun the prey with their tails. This is often done in groups and/or pairs. They have also been known to kill sea birds with their tails.

Blue Sharks

Blue sharks:
Blue sharks are found in all of Rhode island and new york salt waters. They are a pelagic species that rarely comes near shore but have been known to frequent inshore areas around block island and locations offshore of montauk new york.
Being a pelagic species the blue shark's habitat consists of open ocean areas around Rhode Island from the surface to 1,148 ft in depth. They prefer cooler water ranging from 44.6-60.8°F but are known to have tolerances for water 69.8°F or greater. When the summer heats up rhode island waters the blue shark tends to seek deeper waters with cooler temperatures. This is evident in the offshore canyon off of rhode island where the majority of blue sharks are found at depths of 262-722 ft where water temperatures range from 53.6-77°F.
The blue shark has a slender, sleek-looking body with a large eye and a long conical snout that is longer than the width of its mouth. It has extremely long, pointed pectoral fins, which generally are as long as the distance from its snout to posterior gill slit. The dorsal fin is moderate in size and set back where it is actually closer to the pelvic fin insertion than the pectoral insertion point. There is a slight keel on the caudal peduncle and the tail is narrowly lobed with a long ventral lobe.  The blue shark's name comes from its distinct dark blue dorsal surface and bright blue sides. Its ventral surface is a well-defined, crisp white color. This contrast in colors is known as counter-shading and provides camouflage for the shark in the open ocean.
The largest blue shark on record measured 12.6 feet but they are rumored to get as large as 20 feet. Males are believed to be mature at four to five years of age and at lengths between 6 feet and 9.2 feet . Females mature slightly older ages ranging from five to six years and longer lengths from 7.3-10.6 feet. They are believed to live for more than 20 years.
Small bony fishes, such as herring and sardines, and invertebrates, such as squid, cuttlefish and pelagic octopi that inhabit the waters of rhode island and new york, make up a majority of the blue shark's diet. They easily feed on certain species of squid that form large breeding aggregations, which allows the blue shark to leisurely collect its unsuspecting prey. Besides actively hunting for food, rhode island blue sharks are opportunistic feeders and have been known to feed from gill nets and scavenge dead marine mammals.our paragraph here.